A head shot of kristan

Dr Kris Stoddart

Associate Professor in Cyber Threats, Criminology

Telephone number

+44 (0) 1792

Welsh language proficiency

Basic Welsh Speaker

Research Links

Available For Postgraduate Supervision

About

Kristan Stoddart is an Associate Professor for Cyber Threats in the Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law. Previously he was a Reader in the Department of International Politics at Aberystwyth University where he was also the Deputy Director of the Centre for Intelligence and International Security Studies. From 2014 to 2017 he worked on a project examining Cyber Security Lifecycles funded by Airbus Group and the Welsh Government and was a member of the UK’s Independent Digital Ethics in Policing Panel for around four years through to 2018.

He is a member of the Project on Nuclear Issues, a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. He has spoken at a wide number of conferences, nationally and internationally, including NATO and US Strategic Command, and for various forms of media, including the BBC. He is the author or co-author of four books and many articles. He has recently completed two further books: Cyberwar: Threats to Critical Infrastructure, and its companion volume, Cyberespionage: Russian and Chinese uses against the West. A third, One Ring to Rule Them All? Comparative Studies of Cyber Security between States, is in preparation.

Areas Of Expertise

  • Cybersecurity
  • Cyberwarfare
  • Cyberespionage
  • Cyber terrorism
  • Cybercrime and the law
  • International security
  • Intelligence Studies
  • Nuclear weapons

Career Highlights

Teaching Interests
  • Cybersecurity
  • Cyberwarfare
  • Cyberespionage
  • Cyber terrorism
  • Cybercrime
  • Cyber law
  • International security
  • Intelligence Studies
  • Nuclear weapons
Research

Kristan primarily works in the field of cyber security in areas which raise technical, strategic, legal, and political questions. His knowledge and engagement with this field includes wider related areas such as technical architecture, hardware and software, the uses and misuses of the Internet, Artificial Intelligence, privacy, lawfare, robotics, cybernetics and remote warfare. His main focus is on national/global policies, drawing on the technical base and the human layer.

From his PhD in 2006 through to 2014, he has primarily conducted research into global nuclear weapons issues and has published four books in this area. His work in both the nuclear weapons and cyber security fields also meet at the intersection with intelligence practises and Intelligence Studies.